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Tim Waggoner will be enlightening us at the second annual Retreat to the Springs! Tim has published close to forty novels and three collections of short stories. He writestim pic 2 original dark fantasy and horror, as well as media tie-ins, and his articles on writing have appeared in numerous publications. In 2017 he received the Bram Stoker Award for Superior Achievement in Long Fiction. He’s been a finalist for the Shirley Jackson Award and the Scribe Award. His fiction has also received numerous Honorable Mentions in volumes of Best Horror of the Year. He’s also a full-time tenured professor who teaches creative writing and composition at Sinclair College in Dayton, Ohio. He took time to talk about his life as a writer.

Q:       What made you choose your genre(s)?

Tim:    I’m not sure I did choose them. I’ve been interested in horror, fantasy, and science fiction since I was a small child. I was fascinated by the idea that dinosaurs were real creatures who lived and walked on Earth at one time — maybe even right where I lived. And my mom and dad let me watch horror and SF movies on TV (as long as they weren’t too scary). My dad liked to read SF/F/H too, and as I got older, he’d let me read his books when he was finished. I got into reading comics when I was in seventh grade. This was back in the late seventies, and the big wave of 80’s sci-fi and horror movies was just around the corner. By the time it hit, I could drive, and I saw as many of these now-classic films in the theater as I could. Growing up with all these influences, it’s no wonder I write the kind of stuff I do.

Q:     What do you consider to be the first meaningful things you wrote? (For example, I had a poem published in a national magazine when I was 10. I then wrote my autobiography when I was 12, but my mother said no one would buy it until I had done something meaningful. I then wrote a “Nancy Drew” book the next year. Even though I’ve published nine books, those three things are what stick in my mind.)

Tim:    When I was sixteen, I took a creative writing class in high school. There, I wrote a story called “The Last Christmas Present” about the last surviving Christmas elf who is trying to continue delivering presents on his own and having great difficulty managing it. One Christmas eve, the elf sees a young boy about to be hit by a car, and he pushes the boy out of the way, saving his life. Unfortunately, the elf is hit and dies from his injuries, his sacrifice being the last present he’ll ever give. This was the first story where I consciously tried to focus on an emotional core, and I realized the difference it made in my writing. The teacher — Mrs. Vagedes — read the story aloud to the class. She nominated me for writer of the month (an honor I didn’t even know my high school offered), and I was interviewed by a local paper, which printed the story alongside my interview. So “The Last Christmas Present” was my first official publication, too.

 

Q:     Is there anything you wish you had not written?

Tim:    My first published novel was a work-for-hire piece of erotica called Dying for It. It was about husband and wife private detectives who had trouble keeping their hands off each other when they’re working. I enjoyed writing the book, and it appeared under my own name. I still list it in my bibliography. But once it came out, I was no longer eligible for a Bram Stoker Award for Best First Novel (an award in the horror genre). My next published novel was a horror story, The Harmony Society, and I think I might have had a shot at the award if I hadn’t written Dying for It. Dying for It came out in 2001, and it would be sixteen more years before I finally won a Bram Stoker Award (this one for a novella called The Winter Box). But this is such a mild regret. As I said earlier, I was happy with Dying for It — and I still am.

Q:     Do you read your books after they’re published?

Tim:    Nope. I don’t read the anthologies or magazines my stories are printed in, either. In the movie The Gumball Rally, which is about a cross-country road race — Raul Julia plays a character who, just before the race begins, breaks off his car’s rearview mirror and tosses it in the back seat. He says, “The first rule of Italian driving: What’s behind me is not important.” I feel it’s better to focus on what I’m working on now, and what I’m going to be working on next, rather than stuff I’ve already had published. Every once in a great while, I pick up a book and read a few lines. I never remember writing them, and they always strike me as much better written than what I’m capable of producing now. This reminds me why I shouldn’t re-read my own books!

Q:     How do you feel about self-publishing? It has lost a lot of the stigma of “vanity” publishing.

Tim:    I believe you’re right about self-publishing no longer being viewed as a lesser form of publication — for the most part. What concerns me about it is that if writers can publish their work so easily, what incentive do they have to improve their craft? How do they even know their craft needs improvement? In many ways, self-publishing is like making YouTube videos. People can make a video where they sing, perform on a musical instrument, perform a comedy skit, etc. It’s a wonderful form of self-expression, but how many of these performances would we consider to be of professional quality? How many would be pay to see? I’ve no doubt there are self-published novels as good as anything that’s traditionally published. But traditional publishers vouch for the books they produce, giving readers confidence that these books are at least up to a certain standard. There’s no such assurance with self-published work. On the other hand, self-publishing is a great avenue for works that don’t easily fit into a marketing category whether because of content, length, etc. But it’s the instant gratification aspect for writers that worries me about self-publishing. Over the last few years, I’ve heard student writers say variations on, “I don’t care if my book isn’t good enough to be traditionally published. I’ll just self-publish it.” As a teacher, I wish I knew what to do to change that attitude.

Q:     From when you first started seriously pitching your first book, how long did it take to be picked up?

Tim:    As I said earlier, my first published book was Dying for It. I’d once collaborated with the editor on a short story, and he contacted me and asked me to pitch some ideas for the erotica publisher he was working for. I pitched a few, he liked one, gave me a contract, and I started writing it. It didn’t take long for me to get the contract. I was in the process of developing a second novel for the editor — this time an erotic horror story — when the company folded. I’ve since written and published over forty novels, and most of those have been sold on a pitch or an outline, and only then do I actually write the book. It’s been close to twenty years since I’ve written a book without having a contract in place first.

Q:     What is your writing routine? Do you have one?

Tim:    I teach college composition and creative writing in my day job, so I write when I’m not teaching. I tend to start slow on a book. I work from an outline, and I produce maybe twenty pages a week, sometimes more, sometimes less depending on if I have papers to grade that week. Then when I get past the halfway point on a book, it’s like coming down a hill on a roller coaster. I pick up speed, writing every available moment I can find until the book is finally finished. Once I have an outline in place, it usually takes me about three to four months to write a book this way.

Q:     If you didn’t write in your genre, what would you be writing?

Tim:    Mysteries, maybe. I enjoy series detective fiction, and I think it would be a lot of fun to develop a sleuth I could tell many stories about. I might write thrillers. The thriller is a close cousin to both mystery and horror, so it might scratch both of those itches for me.

Q:     What was your harshest rejection? What was your best rejection?

Tim:    I don’t recall ever receiving a rejection that I considered too harsh. I did once receive an email from someone I didn’t know, written in all lowercase letters, no punctuation, that said you write badly. My best rejection came from an editor at a German publisher which prints translations of many English-speaking writers’ horror novels. When I inquired about the possibility of their publishing translations of my novels, the editor wrote back apologizing, saying my work for too good for them to publish.

Q:     What did you do when your very first book arrived? (I opened my first book and smelled it.)

Tim:     I can’t remember. I’m sure I ran my fingers across the cover, held it in my hand to feel the weight, opened it to the title page to see my name printed there, opened it to the middle to see what the text looked like, and of course smelled it. Aren’t these things all writers do?

Q:      Where do you think your genre is going? What are the changes you’ve seen?

Tim:    Horror is poised for a new renaissance, thanks to the recent spate of arthouse horror films, literary horror novels, and popular original films and series that debut on streaming media. Major publishers stopped producing horror for the most part after the horror boom of the 1980’s fizzled out in the early 90’s. The small press stepped in to fill the gap, and now horror has a strong, thriving small-press scene. But major publishers are once again establishing horror lines, and we should start seeing a much stronger presence of horror fiction in the mass market. It’s a great time to be a horror writer!

Q:     Do you ever think back on your first book and wish you’d done something differently?

Tim:    Never.

Q:     Do you recommend getting an agent? How many agents have you had?

Tim:    I’m currently on my third agent. I got my first one when I was twenty-six. I’m fifty-five now. If someone writes novels and wants to be traditionally published in mass market, an agent is a must. Most larger publishing houses won’t look at a book unless it’s represented by an agent. But if you want to publish with the small press or self-publish, an agent isn’t necessary. I have novelist friends who don’t use agents, who prefer to find their own deals and negotiate their own contracts. But unless you know what you’re doing when it comes to the business of publishing, and you’re confident you can negotiate aggressively, I think you’re better off with a good agent. I’d rather write than deal with business stuff, so I prefer working with an agent.

Q:     Anything else you’d like to add?

Tim:    Not that I can think of.

Retreat to the Springs! takes place Aug. 2 to 4, 2019, in Yellow Springs, Ohio. Besides Tim Waggoner, we will also have Maddie James and Jeffrey Marks on faculty.

For more information:

August 2–4, 2019, “Focus on Fiction” Details

Schedule 

Q&A with Maddie James 

Q&A with Jeffrey Marks 

Register by July 25, 2019: To keep our intimate setting and personal attention, the workshop is limited to 25 people.

Location: John Bryan Community Center
100 Dayton St.
Yellow Springs, Ohio 45387


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Well, the reviews are in and they’re great!

OK, I’ve actually had them for weeks, but I just remembered that I have to send them to Communiversity at UC. In April, I taught a one-day workshop called “Writing to Publish.” We had a great class, with lots of good questions about writing, formatting, and publishing your work.

Here are some of the highlights from the evaluations:

“You learn from a person who actually practices. Thank you. Loved it!”

“I learned exercises to help me unlock my writing blocks.”

“Fantastic! I truly learned so much about the writing market. [Would recommend this class to others] absolutely — so informative and so constructive. Very thorough, I wouldn’t change a thing.”

Your next opportunity to hear my instruction on writing and publishing will be at my Capon Springs Nonfiction Writers’ Retreat. Even if fiction’s your thing, you’ll benefit from the beautiful surroundings and the instruction from Ann Hagedorn and me.

Registration deadline is August 15. Make your $50 deposit through PayPal to reserve your place.

Ready to go? Make your deposit with PayPal:
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Capon Springs Nonfiction Writers’ Retreat
Postponed to Fall 2016
Capon Springs, West Virginia

Join us for a retreat in a fantastic mountain setting, where you’ll receive expert instruction from two award-winning writers: Ann Hagedorn and Wendy Hart Beckman. Learn the strategies and tactics of being a successful nonfiction author. Experience a one-on-one manuscript critique. And enjoy personal time for writing while exploring the exquisite, inspiring surroundings! The retreat fee of $450 includes all workshop instruction, lodging, meals, gratuities, and taxes. (more…)

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Sunday, March 23, at 2 p.m. will be another of our great Writing Workshop Workshops. As usual, we’ll be gathering downstairs at Olive’s in Cincinnati’s Clifton Gaslight District.

Bring seven minutes’ worth of your writing to read, $5 for the kitty, your books to sell, any publishing or writing questions you’d like to ask, and a friend or two. I hope I will have a big announcement for you!

Head’s up for April: on Sunday, April 27 (same time, same place), at our Writing Workshop Workshop, we’ll be joined by Carol Topp, CPA, author of Business Tips and Taxes for Writers. It’s too late for your 2013 filing, but Carol will have lots of great advice for your 2014 return on how to be a professional writer, in terms of what’s deductible and what’s not.

So put April 27 on your calendar, and in the meantime I hope to see you Sunday, March 23, at 2!

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Looking for a gift for a loved one this holiday season? I’d like to make a few recommendations. You might notice a theme here. OK, I’ll make a full disclosure: the following are books I edited.

Want your mind to be entertained with some food for thought while your stomach is digesting its own food? Then take a look at Benjamin Gorman’s The Sum of Our Gods.

Here’s the description from the author: Joe has been cursed. He musSum of Our Godst meet with Yahweh, the Creator, once a week for coffee and listen to God complain. Yahweh is a crotchety old deity with a pantheon of family problems. His wife, Frigga, has basically stopped talking to Him, except to nag Him about retiring. His son, Jesus, suffers from crippling depression. Oh, and Jesus’ estranged wife is planning a terrorist attack to start a holy war. God is fed up with all the drama. He’s perfectly tired and infinitely irritable. Though God doesn’t seem to care about human problems, Joe’s little, mortal life isn’t perfect, either. In fact, it’s a comedy as black as God’s coffee.

My two cents: The Sum of Our Gods, Ben Gorman’s first published novel, just blew my socks off in a quirky way. Ben’s paternal grandparents are Catholic and Jewish; their son — Ben’s father, is a Presbyterian minister — as is Ben’s mother. Ben, himself, holds a degree in philosophy, is married to a Quaker, teaches creative writing and calls himself agnostic. How could he not help but write a brilliant novel full of the gods wrestling with their demons and each other? Yes, godS. His working title for the book was “And Lo, God Took His Coffee Black” (in case you wondered.) This is a fantastic debut novel, and I can’t wait for Ben’s second!

If you don’t want to think that hard, or if nonfiction is more what you’re looking for, try Paige Adams Strickland’s Akin to the Truth. Her memoir would be of interest to people in the adoption triad or anyone who grew up in the Cincinnati area in the 1960s and 70s. Akin to the Truth

From the author: In 1961 Paige was put up for adoption, a more taboo and secretive topic than it is today. Paige’s adoptive family chose not to focus on the adoption, but instead function as a regular family with natural children. However, being adopted made her feel vulnerable and unreal. She longed to know more about her true self. In Akin to the Truth: A Memoir of Adoption and Identity, Paige tells stories from the perspective of a child and adolescent, growing up with a closely guarded secret. Through vignettes, Paige relates feelings about her adoption to forming and maintaining relationships, caring for pets, moving to new houses and neighborhoods, losing loved ones and entering young adulthood.  Her need for acceptance is juxtaposed with her adoptive father’s increasingly erratic behavior. This is a tale of family joys and hardships, friendships, falling in love and the need to belong. It is set in the era of free love, social unrest and unexpected change during the 1960s, 70s and 80s.

From me: Throughout Paige’s childhood, she struggled with feelings of loss, establishing her identity, and tiptoeing through an awkward relationship with her father. Knowing that she was adopted heightened these challenges and added another: finding her birth family. In this entertaining memoir, Paige recounts how she faced her “demons,” and how she learned that she was not alone.

Spreading our interest geographically and chronologically brings us to another memoir, Over My Shoulder: 1931–1945, by the distinguished Ewin Gaby. Over My Shoulder

About the book: History books generally avoid the details of human life. They tell of what happened at a time, but not how it affected those living through that time. The depression of the 1930’s and the war of the early 1940’s changed the world, and history books provide great detail as to the causes and of the changes brought about. Still, how families handled these challenges cannot be told in a book of history, because each family had its own manner of living through these significant historical periods. This book is the story of how a young boy and his family live through the depression of the 30’s and the Second World War. Unlike many others, his father is employed, but that employment causes them to live in 145 towns in his first ten years. When the Second World War begins, they move to New Orleans for the next four years. What a way to grow up!

A few notes from me: Ewin’s book is available in paperback, Kindle or CD version. I recommend the CD highly. With his combination Texas–Louisiana accent, Ewin reads his memoir wonderfully. You can sit back and just listen to a time when kids played outside until it got dark, when mothers and kids pulled together to make the family run while fathers were away during the war, when school kids ran paper drives to support the war effort. Shoot, if your father or grandfather is no longer with you, get the CD and it’s as if you’re together again, hearing stories about the old days, when life was simple.

And a little shameless self-promotion:

My first book, Artists and Writers of the Harlem Renaissance (Enslow, 2002) has gone into a  second printing. Now titled Harlem Renaissance Artists and Writers,  it is available in library binding, paperback and e versions.Harlem Renaissance Artists and Writers

In this book I profile ten African Americans who had key contributions to the Harlem Renaissance, an explosion of creativity that started in New York City in the 1920s. The Harlem Renaissance lasted for about 20 years and had even international repercussions.

Here’s one review of the original book:

Children’s Literature

Harlem, New York, was the setting for a cultural upsurge in the 1920’s and 1930’s. During those decades a series of Black writers, artists, vocalists, and poets sprang forth and gave voice to the conditions of African-Americans. At a time when racial prejudice was even more overt than in our own age, it took great courage for Black artists to stand up and honestly portray their lot in America. Artists such as Langston Hughes, Bessie Smith, Duke Ellington, and Josephine Baker all provided a unique expression to what it meant to be a Black person either living in America or with American roots. This artistic movement came to be known as the Harlem Renaissance and that is the subject covered in this collection of short biographies. In this illustrated selection author Wendy Hart Beckman provides encapsulated biographies of ten artists who participated in the Harlem Renaissance. In each instance Ms. Beckman provides a careful outline of the artist’s background, development, contributions, and later life. This is a good reference tool for readers with an interest in African-American history or specifically Black artists of this era. The Harlem Renaissance was a significant movement in American culture and Ms. Beckman does well to offer readers a summary of some of the leading lights of that period.

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Thanks to everyone who came to the Write On! Workshop Cincy Style yesterday. Judging from the evaluations, and speaking for Val and me, a great time was had by all! And didn’t Colleen Zuber at the Refuge Coffee Bar serve us a great lunch? Steve Gillen’s presentation on Copyrights and Contracts (and all the extra tips he gave us!) is surely going to save many of us a lot of headaches.

For yesterday’s participants: did you feel as if your head was spinning and you couldn’t write fast enough? For those who couldn’t make it: are you kicking yourself now? Never fear! Sign up now for the Write On! Workshop that we’re holding in Dayton on March 31, 2012. See you there!

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